the letters in "SEGA"

Does anyone know what they stand for.....I was watchin TV at the arcade and this came on as a trivia thing.........see if anyone knows the answer
 

racketboy

Member
well I'm interested in hearing what the trivia box has to say

But I'm pretty sure that's where Sega's name comes from
 

Gallstaff

Member
I hate arcade tv... it's usually some shitty thing distributed to arcades all across the region. Do you have this "channel M" thing with a bunch of crappy music videos (which you can't even hear anyway). I dunno sometimes something good pops up like Tenacious D and sometimes they play movies or anime. But that does spark my interest.... do you have channel m?
 

JCTango

New Member
Originally posted by racketboy@Apr 4, 2003 @ 05:25 PM

SErvice GAmes

It's Sega's original name (originally in US, for an added fact)

Ahh...

so that's why we have, or used to have that segaXtreme member with that name...

Remember? That whole FTP fiasco?
 

racketboy

Member
Originally posted by JCTango+Apr 4, 2003 @ 11:22 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(JCTango @ Apr 4, 2003 @ 11:22 PM)</div><div class='quotemain'> <!--QuoteBegin-racketboy@Apr 4, 2003 @ 05:25 PM

SErvice GAmes

It's Sega's original name (originally in US, for an added fact)

Ahh...

so that's why we have, or used to have that segaXtreme member with that name...

Remember? That whole FTP fiasco? [/b][/quote]

I think I remember the username, but not the FTP problem
 

Tony Skyrunner

New Member
4 words?

I thought SEGA was the result of the merger between David Rosen's company and Service Games...

[EDIT] I've just found it.

The Early Years Sega’s roots stretch back to 1940 and a Honolulu-based company called Standard Games, formed by Martin Bromely, Irving Bromberg, and James Humpert. In 1951, Bromely inspired the company’s move to Tokyo, and Service Games of Japan (also known as Sega) was officially registered in May of 1952. Initially, Sega provided coin-op machines to U.S. military units stationed in Japan. The business branched out from there, supplying the domestic Japanese market as well as parts of Asia and Europe.

In 1965, Sega merged with another coin-op company, Rosen Enterprises, Inc. Formed by American entrepreneur David Rosen in 1954, Rosen Enterprises dealt in everything from instant photo booths to mechanical arcade games. A year after the merger, Sega released Periscope, a submarine simulator that became a worldwide hit. In 1969, Rosen and the other shareholders decided to sell Sega to Gulf & Western Industries, with Rosen continuing on as CEO.

Gulf & Western continued to build on the company's original product and marketing strategy, with revenues hitting $214 million in 1982. By 1983, several "firsts" were introduced, including the first laser disc game, Sega Astron Belt, the first 3D video game, SubRoc-3D, and Sega's first consumer video game console, SG-1000, all marketed in Japan.

The arcades and the U.S. home market crashed shortly after. Gulf & Western, which had spun off 20 percent of Sega, bought back the public shares and sold the U. S. assets to Bally Manufacturing Corp.

However, in Japan, Sega survived. Back in 1979, Rosen had acquired a distribution company founded by a Japanese entrepreneur, Hayao Nakayama. Following the crash, Rosen joined Nakayama and other Japanese investors to buy the Japanese assets of Sega for $38 million. Nakayama became chief executive and Rosen headed the U.S. subsidiary. From that point forward, the company vowed to stick not with one concept too long, realizing that each generation of technology has a life and death.

In 1984, Sega Enterprises was bought by a partnership between Sega Enterprises Japanese management and CSK, forming Sega Enterprises Ltd., a Japan-based company.

In 1986, Sega Enterprises Ltd.'s stock was listed over the counter on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. In addition, Sega of America was established to adapt and market video game products to a rapidly expanding American market. It was subsequently given the charter to develop software products specifically for the American market.

In the late 1980s, Sega Enterprises introduced a line of extremely successful video game systems and software titles that propelled the company into international prominence, making it the world's second largest vendor of consumer video game products. In 1990, Sega Enterprises Ltd.'s stock was listed on the first tier of the Tokyo Stock Exchange. In 1993, the stock was listed on the pink sheets of NASDAQ and available in ADR in the U.S.

From sega.com


Sonic is the only non-Disney character featured at Disney World today.

Curious
 

Gallstaff

Member
It's so sad really... If you show a kid, say 12 years old a picture of sonic he'll know it's sega. Show him a picture of Toejam and earl and he might remember but then show him a picture of wonderboy, or the little dude from rocket knight adventures (I can't remember his name but I'd know he's sega if i saw him!) and they wont know what the crap it is.
 

Myname

Member
Originally posted by Gallstaff@Apr 5, 2003 @ 09:02 AM

It's so sad really... If you show a kid, say 12 years old a picture of sonic he'll know it's sega. Show him a picture of Toejam and earl and he might remember but then show him a picture of wonderboy, or the little dude from rocket knight adventures (I can't remember his name but I'd know he's sega if i saw him!) and they wont know what the crap it is.

Hate to be picky (actually I don't), but Rocket Knight Adventures and Sparkster were Konami games and came out on the SNES too.
 
Ya, it's that channel M bullshit....it's on the new one w/ the linkin park music videos, taproot is on there....cold is also on it I believe. Check it out next time u are at the arcade.....I am gunna go today to rate girls as they go by (we hold up signs, the walls are glass so they can see.....a lot of the time they come in and talk to us, it's good times) so i am gunna double check what it says....it's like Scotch Entertainment somethin or other
 

Gallstaff

Member
No it's not like a real channel it's just something made for arcade tv called channel M. I guess the M is the "music." It's taped so meh.
 

VertigoXX

Mid Boss
Though it is SErvice GAmes, could they have thought it was either of these?

Service Electronic Games of America

Service Electronic Game Association

?????
 

Ammut

New Member
Originally posted by BJammzz@Apr 6, 2003 @ 01:03 AM

Scotch Entertainment Games America

Weird huh? anyone know where to/if u can e-mail SEGA and ask them if this is correct?

If you check out Sega.com, it states in the history that Sega does indeed come from Service Games.... They stamped SEGA for short on the first bunch of machines that went out and it just stuck. Read this awhile ago on the site but it should still be there.

Sega for me stands for:

Super Exciting Games Andbadadvertising

---Ammut
 
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