650 meg cdr

googlefest1

New Member
does anyone have a source for buying 650 meg cdrs?

i rarely find any at a computer show - and they sell fast

im hopeing someone likes to use those too and has an online source for them.

i keep hearing that they dont make them anymore - so if thats true i want to get a hold of as many as i can where ever i can find them

also what happend to the new smiles (the party one)

also does ne1 have an idea of which burner burns the hardest or strongest --uses higher powered lazers mabey
 

googlefest1

New Member
#1 650s only work in my old changer in my car

#2 from what i read about cdrs is that the 650s have wider tracks which makes it easier for the laser to follow therfore proloning the life of your old cdrom so i like to use these in my old games systems as well

and never mind guys i found some good sources -- some companies still make them - aperantly music industrly people still like to use them -- i gues demand is lower and thats why prices are like double 80 min cdrs

my audiophile co-worker here says the same thing and he says he uses mitsuri and will never put 90 and 99 min cd-rs in any of his equipment

here is a cheap one but certainly not at the 12.99 price i used to pay

edit: damn i forgot to put the link and now i dont have it well anyways they would have been 30$ for 100( including the shiping)
 

Taelon

Member
:bs

I don't think there's any way for a car stereo to refuse 700MB CDs unless it's really, really crappy (or borderline damaged already)...

700MB/80min CDs are the de-facto standard nowadays, and while it's true that the tracks are closer together, the difference is negligible - I've never encountered any type of CD drive (audio or data, new or old) that couldn't read 700MB discs, and I've encountered many drives.

Nobody is asking you to use 90min or 99min CDs, now THOSE DO push the limits and you wouldn't find me dead using them
that said they're not even that easy to find.

Also, asking what kind of CD recorder burns with the strongest laser etc. is a question stemming from ignorance. Each CD recorder and each brand and type of CD are ever so slightly different and need JUST the right amount of laser power to burn CDs correctly and reliably. Practically any CD recorder auto-adjusts itself to the disc inserted every time you start a recording - there's a special area before the beginning of the regular recording area that's used just for this calibration. Just asking for the highest-powered laser isn't something you want to do.

From the sound of it you think of yourself as an audiophile. Do yourself a favor and don't worry about CD and drive brands (just buy decent ones) - worry instead about the SOURCES you record music from to get the best quality.


And don't go crazy burning with 48x speeds or the like, either... something moderate like 8x or 16x will give you the best results.
 

Quadriflax

New Member
:agree

Anyway, are you sure it's not just the brand/type of CDR that your car CD player can't read? I've had problems with reading some dark blue CDRs, but everything else works fine in all the drives I have. It being an old player, it might just be really picky.
 

ExCyber

Staff member
from what i read about cdrs is that the 650s have wider tracks which makes it easier for the laser to follow therfore proloning the life of your old cdrom
I can't imagine how the variation in track pitch between 74/80-minute discs would affect the lifetime of the reader...

Practically any CD recorder auto-adjusts itself to the disc inserted every time you start a recording - there's a special area before the beginning of the regular recording area that's used just for this calibration.
Some drives do a better job of this than others, and the best ones don't just calibrate once but are constantly checking the disc to compensate for variations in dye distribution across the disc area. From what I've heard, Plextor, Yamaha, and TDK drives do the best job of this.

my audiophile co-worker here says the same thing and he says he uses mitsuri
Never heard of Mitsuri (maybe he misread Mitsumi or Mitsui?), but the top-tier manufacturers of CD-R media are (in no particular order):

Taiyo Yuden

TDK

Mitsui Chemical

Mitsubishi Chemical / Verbatim

Maxell

Most brands of CD-R media (Imation, Memorex, etc.) do not represent an actual manufacturer, and change manufacturers on a fairly regular basis. TDK and Maxell even supply cheap Taiwanese (CMC Magnetics or Ritek) discs rebranded as their own, so be sure to check labels.
 

mtxblau

Mid Boss
Originally posted by Taelon@Feb 11, 2003 @ 10:16 PM

I don't think there's any way for a car stereo to refuse 700MB CDs unless it's really, really crappy (or borderline damaged already)...
It's just very old.
 

googlefest1

New Member
dude this was the first changer put out by kenwood mabey 9 years ago

- it has an extremely hard time reading anything but 650s

and taleaon - thats not fair to say since you dont know what im baseing my question on

back when cd burners were 500$ i read articles which included laser power also back in the psx copy frenzy time (around where i was) most articles written about whcih burners worked best for copying psx cds also mentioned laser power and "stronger burn" -- also working with lasers - i know that there are laser diodes that cost 5$ and 1500$ and that the more you buy the cheaper they are right so that also plays into design -- im sure not all companies use the same laser therefore thier characteristics vary - some lasers do not have perfect wavelength peaks - some are more stable than others - some operate diferently under certain environmental conditions-- since the main part of the laser is grown they ever so slightly vary and can be put into diferent classes -- so even though the burners calibrate that dosent mean they all work the same -- they calibrate themselves to perform thier task the best they can

- but have you ever had three burners burning the same files onto the same brand cd at the same speed - and then look at the bottoms they look different one more pronouced than the other --- consistantly every time -- and out of those 3 burners one consistanly played better in the car stereo

so my question was based on this experience and those articles (outdated it may be)

mabey today its a diferent ball game especialy since the demand for burners has multiplied many times and made them cheaper to manufacture -- mabey this only applies to the cheapo ones -- i dont know - thats why i asked - before picking up some reading material about burners

the track width thing was for the older drives haveing to do with motors and gear teeth and being designed for 650 posibly making them work harder to move less for each track ? -- not an expert
 

Taelon

Member
Well, WHOA ... I dunno, but all this seems like engineering details to me, stuff that I leave to actual engineers
plus you say this is info you got from the early days... well, both CD drives and media have matured big time since then... Personally I've never had ONE SINGLE PROBLEM with my CDRW drive, no matter what media I used and where I tried to play it (goes for my Saturn, Dreamcast, my old Toshiba SCSI 4x CD-ROM, our Fisher DVD player, my wife's Clarion car stereo, two PC drives, two portable players... the list goes on).

I'm sorry if I seem unfair, but if your only problem is that you can't play 700MB audio CDs in your Kenwood car stereo, then you're really going about this whole thing the wrong way. Your optimal solution would be a NEW CAR CD PLAYER (they're not that expensive anymore, either). It's what I would do if I were you. Really.

As for all the technical details, just don't worry about them. You sound like a vinyl audiophile who's concerned with what kind of wires to use to connect a cartridge to the tonearm, or which stylus force gauge is the most accurate to use, and whether it matters that the anti-skating force be equal over the entire sweep range of the tonearm while playing a record, or not.
 

ExCyber

Staff member
Don't forget to get a cartridge that's rated for 10Hz-25KHz.


Seriously though, there's no real harm in considering this stuff if you actually go to the trouble to get good information, and don't believe anything told to you by people trying to make you spend money.
 

googlefest1

New Member
LOL Dude im not that old -- im looking to buy another burner and i want the best for my money not the most expensive -- also i want the cd roms i will be playing the cdrs in to have the easiest time reading them

and yea i did mispell mitsui http://www.cascademedia.net/mitsuifaq.html

and 10 disk cd changers are still expensive (last i looked) and it is a bit banged up cause it sits in the trunk -- but it still works fine with originals and 650 meg cd-r s when you put in a 700 it either wont read or read it with alot of trouble and skip around

but my concern is not with that (i was just using it as an example ) -- i just want my precious saturns and the original disks to live forever


edit : if i was into vinyl - yea i would be like that i like things to be as perfect as they can
 

Taelon

Member
But that's the beauty of CDs to start with - anytime a disc starts to go, you just copy it to a new one
even keep two identical backups at a time (I do this with impossible-to-recreate CDRs of mine). OK, so maybe audio does start to degrade after many copies, since its error correction is very basic and errors do add up from copy to copy (especially if you do a raw copy)... but with data, you're set for life, the whole concept of digital storage makes sure of that.
 

googlefest1

New Member
Originally posted by Taelon@Feb 13, 2003 @ 08:52 PM

even keep two identical backups at a time (I do this with impossible-to-recreate CDRs of mine).

i keep 2 back ups also - i try to keep the originals real safe (mabey too safe
)
 
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