Debate: Ripping SPEEDS!

Jaded God

Member
Ok... So me and rabbit are in an argument.

We are talking about dvdrw drives and he starts talking about cdrw drives too..

Rabbit states that rip speed doesn't matter and only the burn speed matters.

Please set this Rabbit straight, :lol:
 
Keeping in mind that I've been burning since I got my 2x burner back in the day. Please don't just say it matters or not, let's hear your proof lol.

edit: my brain is faster than my fingers (which says a lot), corrections to sentences to reflect said problem.
 

ExCyber

Staff member
As long as your software/firmware is actually checking for read errors, you should be able to rip at whatever speed allows correct reading. Ideally the software should automatically drop to a slower speed and retry the read when there is a high error rate. This works because CDs contain error correction/detection data (in fact this is a large portion of the disc's raw data) that can be used to check if a read was correct and sometimes to reconstruct the correct data if only a few bits are off (fundamentally it's the same technique as used by PAR files and RAID 5 arrays).

Now as to whether or not it matters at all, it does - higher speeds are more likely to run into errors and require a retry/drop to a slower speed. However, it has no effect on the readability of the produced copy unless your software and/or firmware are broken.
 

racketboy

Member
Originally posted by ExCyber@Aug 20, 2003 @ 02:14 AM

As long as your software/firmware is actually checking for read errors, you should be able to rip at whatever speed allows correct reading. Ideally the software should automatically drop to a slower speed and retry the read when there is a high error rate. This works because CDs contain error correction/detection data (in fact this is a large portion of the disc's raw data) that can be used to check if a read was correct and sometimes to reconstruct the correct data if only a few bits are off (fundamentally it's the same technique as used by PAR files and RAID 5 arrays).

Now as to whether or not it matters at all, it does - higher speeds are more likely to run into errors and require a retry/drop to a slower speed. However, it has no effect on the readability of the produced copy unless your software and/or firmware are broken.
well put
 

Jaded God

Member
BAM! Exactly what I think... There you go Rabbit... I told you.

Getting all mad and going all out on AIM over this to me. Saying he doesn't care and he would just buy a new ps2... Why would you want to if you could just prevent it??? :huh
 

Tindo@heart

New Member
Originally posted by Jaded God@Aug 19, 2003 @ 06:14 PM

Ok... So me and rabbit are in an argument.

We are talking about dvdrw drives and he starts talking about cdrw drives too..

Rabbit states that rip speed doesn't matter and only the burn speed matters.

Please set this Rabbit straight, :lol:
:lol: I'm confused.

you said "Rabbit states that rip speed doesn't matter and only the burn speed matters."

and Excyber and everyone says "you should be able to rip at whatever speed allows correct reading."

... So? Rabbit is correct in thinking rip speed doesn't matter?
 

IBarracudaI

New Member
lol, As Excyber said if the software/firmware works properly even when you set a high ripping speed the cdrom/dvdrom drive should slow down the reading speed if it finds some "harder to read" areas.. like scratches or somethings..

So.. ripping speed may affect, but as long as your cdrom is smart there should be no problems..

As for burning process the speed is somewhat more relevant.. we all know what happens with segacd iso's when they're burned at light-speed :p but thats because of the cdrom drive.. lol
 

Zero 9

New Member
Most new cd burners seem to adjust the speed to whatever it can do without errors, so writing speed also will not effect your final result. :huh
 

Jaded God

Member
Now as to whether or not it matters at all, it does - higher speeds are more likely to run into errors and require a retry/drop to a slower speed. However, it has no effect on the readability of the produced copy unless your software and/or firmware are broken.
You guys can't read or what? No rabbit incorrect.
 

Nadius

Member
Originally posted by ExCyber@Aug 20, 2003 @ 12:14 AM

Now as to whether or not it matters at all, it does - higher speeds are more likely to run into errors and require a retry/drop to a slower speed. However, it has no effect on the readability of the produced copy unless your software and/or firmware are broken.
....soooo technically, ripping speed matters... but realistically, what you set the speed at doesn't matter as long as the cdrom and burning app can handle it... that's what i got....

i guess you guys have to give a better definition of what you two were arguing about.
 

Tindo@heart

New Member
Originally posted by Jaded God+Aug 21, 2003 @ 12:54 AM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Jaded God @ Aug 21, 2003 @ 12:54 AM)</div><div class='quotemain'> Read the last part of what ExCyber said, tard. <_< [/b]


<!--QuoteBegin-ExCyber


However, it has no effect on the readability of the produced copy unless your software and/or firmware are broken. [/quote]

ok :lol:

Who's gonna use a broken drive? :D
 

ExCyber

Staff member
It's not unheard of for firmware to have significant flaws. My first drive's did: it reported support of DAO modes, but locked up if a program actually tried to use them (apparently this was a common problem with early Yamaha firmwares). I haven't heard of any having flawed EDC/ECC, but it could happen
 
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