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Myname

Member
Guess most have you will have see my first bit of bad luck. Now for number 2:

*Myname puts laptop on ebay

*Buyer wins auction for £1000 and pays with Paypal

*Myname transfers funds to his bank account

*Hours pass

*Myname recieves notice from Paypal that the transaction has been reversed, leaving his Paypal account at a whopping minus $1500

*Myname is confused, scratches head until headache comes

*Myname is informed that he is a victim of credit card fraud

*Myname ANGRY

Ever feel like the world strapped you to a bed of nails and started kicking your face with steel toecaps?
 

Raijin Z

New Member
It's been common knowledge for years that Paypal was not a bank, MUCH LESS and FDIC insured bank. Such is the reason why I only deal with individuals using Western Union money orders. Legit businesses get the credit O-K.
 

Curtis

Member
Oh dear...the world of online commerce hasn't been too kind to you, eh?

At least you didn't send the item...
 

Myname

Member
No, and I could kiss my local Post Office for only opening until noon on Wednesdays. Waiting for Paypal to reply to me as the guy who's card it actually was says that the f*!$£r hasn't been arrested yet and obviously I've got his name and address right in front of me.
 

Myname

Member
Thought I'd give you an update. Paypal finally let me know that they have cancelled the payment going into my bank account so I'm not in as deep shit as I thought. However, obviously Paypal took their 3% charge when the money first went into my account and they will not give it back. So basically, due to no fault of my own I have lost $70 and Paypal have very unfairly gained it. So first of all I'd like to say:

FUCK PAYPAL

Secondly, take a look at this to find out whose fault this whole thing is (and who say 'no-one has been affected'). So secondly I'd like to say:

FUCK MICROSOFT
 

Gallstaff

Member
yeah well thanks microsoft for putting this information out in the open for all the hacker's to read about and try, that's just genius.
 

IceDigger

Founder
Staff member
I dealt with cc fraud all the time when I accepted cc at litespeedcomputers.com and lost alot of money because of it.

Damn you cc stealers!!!

I feel your pain.
 

antime

Extra Hard Mid Boss
The principle behind full disclosure is that since information about exploits spreads very quickly through the underground making a public announcement at least makes the potential victims aware of the problem, thus allowing them to take some precautions and possibly lessen the impact of the problem. It also puts pressure on the vendors of the vulnerable systems to actually fix the problems.

Also note that that article doesn't contain any real info on how to exploit the bug and only identifies the vulnerable system. Furthermore, judging by the info in the article I'd have to agree that potential exploits don't look that likely.
 

Myname

Member
I told Paypal I'll be seeking legal action if they don't refund my fees so we'll see what they say. That they feel it's OK to profit from credit card fraud is truly beyond me.
 
id get in touch with your local citizens advice bureau if i were you (since your in the uk)

or the cc company you use, and tell them if they dont want to do anything you will take your buissness elsewhere

also inform the buyer that if you cant get the money back you will investigate his libality over it (ie make him refund the fee)
 

racketboy

Member
Yeah I'm starting to hate Paypal more and more between stories like this that I hear and my own experiences.

I've been ripped off numerous times by "verified" sellers that I'm "covered" under. Yeah, unless their email stops working. Paypal's like, "uh, we can't contact the seller, so I guess you're screwed and we're not giving your money back cause we're a bunch of losers".

I just wish there was a good company out there that has a low-cost alternative. It's bad enough I get enough fees eaten out of my "income" from Paypal.

Anyway, Myname I feel your pain. Hopefully your luck will turn around soon.
 

lynx

New Member
sorry to here ya problems. it sucks to get ripped off. i would seek some legal action for one. for two, i would probably do like the other guy said and deal with people who want payment through western union. i myself use paypal, but only with people i know. however, my using o such is far and in between and i ussual ly pay in cash or with money order... sorry ya got hosed... hope things get better.

Lynx D.
 

Myname

Member
Paypal never even told me my account was on hold now, just found that out by myself (whilst I'm expecting $140 for this Megaman game from someone and wanting to buy one of Arakon's multibios'
). They refunded the fees after legal action was mentioned, but I still have to fax them bank and credit card statements to get my account usable again, but at least I haven't lost any money as it stands now.

It seems ebay has done a deal to buy Paypal soon, so whether it will improve then, I don't know.
 

Quadriflax

New Member
It seems ebay has done a deal to buy Paypal soon, so whether it will improve then, I don't know.

Do you have a link somewhere to an article?

Also, has anyone been able to take issue with their CC company to refuse payment? Or is there some rule that says you can't do that?
 

Taelon

Member
This is why I was so adamant, from Day One, to do away with Internet Explorer and *never* use it for so-called "secure" transactions.

My friends: Mozilla is the way to go. Has its own cryptography software built in, uses none of Windows' code. Never EVER had a single problem regarding CC transactions. :)
 

Curtis

Member
Originally posted by Taelon@Sep. 24 2002, 9:00 pm

This is why I was so adamant, from Day One, to do away with Internet Explorer and *never* use it for so-called "secure" transactions.

My friends: Mozilla is the way to go. Has its own cryptography software built in, uses none of Windows' code. Never EVER had a single problem regarding CC transactions. :)

According to the website, Mozilla makes use of the RSA crytographic algorithm. Last time I checked, this was both commonly available and the same as used by IE (V6, at least). Also, http://www.distributed.net was well on their way to cracking it...scary stuff.
 

antime

Extra Hard Mid Boss
Distributed.net have been cracking the same 64-bit key since 1998. Advances in computer technology may make it feasible to crack keys of this length, but if you have that important secrets you already know what encryption algorithms and keylengths to use. Also note that the distributed.net effort is a brute-force approach, ie. they try every possible key until they find a match. That's not the same as breaking the RSA algorithm at all. Furthermore, most security flaws that have been going around in the news are due to programming bugs, not weaknesses in the cryptographic algorithms or protocols.

Another thing to keep in mind is that unless you keep up-to-date with patches and properly administrate your system you are vulnerable no matter what OS or which vendor's software you use.
 
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