.Setting up the Burn

MoonKnight

New Member
I got shiningcd.iso and shiningcd ##.wav and am about to burn it, is this the correct way to do it for playing on Gens? i got a coaster already cuz the wavs were named all funky. a quick yes or no would suffice, i know there are faqs heh

using roxio/adaptec ez cd creator 5 basic
 

Link Hylia

New Member
you do know Gens can play using an ISO and the MP3s?

gens.txt will tell you how

to burn a CD, burn ISO as track 1, WAV/mp3->wav files burnt as track 2-xx in the appropriate order.

for best results, convert MP3s to WAVs beforehand, before burning the actual CD.
 

MoonKnight

New Member
yeah i know i can play with iso/mp3 but i have only 36GB hard drive man so i like to play off of the cds
 

Link Hylia

New Member
burn at 4x if you can, to insure it is a good burn. 20 minutes for 1 Cd

and, as a bonus, you can play on a Real Sega CD!
 

MasterAkumaMatata

Staff member
Originally posted by MoonKnight@Aug. 20 2002, 3:55 am

yeah i know i can play with iso/mp3 but i have only 36GB hard drive man so i like to play off of the cds

You have a 36 GB hard drive and Shining Force ISO+MP3 is like what, 52 MB? Why not give your CD-ROM a rest and play off the ISO+MP3 on your hard drive instead (hard drive usually means faster access)?

Also, if you want to burn, I suggest you not use EZCD Creator 5, but rather use EZCD Pro instead, but make sure you're not running NT, 2K, or XP though. You basically create a mixed mode from image burn and drag and drop the tracks (ISO and WAV) in numerical order.
 

Curtis

Member
Or if you want to play from CD, just burn the files as data and load them from the CD. Saves you the hassle of trying to get Gens to recognise your CD drive too.
 

King M

New Member
if you want to have the game data as an iso-mp3 set, stored on cd, i assume adaptec's software should be fine, but note gens plays mp3's, not wav files. check out gens.txt for the naming schemes.

if you want to create an actual Sega CD disc, you need some decent burning software; adaptec won't cut it. go to www.segacd.org and find the guide "restoring from iso-mp3". you can make a cd that gens will recognize as a Sega CD disc and that will work in an actual Sega CD unit.

also, avoid ezcd pro.
 

XAKEP

New Member
Originally posted by Link Hylia@Aug. 20 2002, 2:51 am

burn at 4x if you can, to insure it is a good burn. 20 minutes for 1 Cd

and, as a bonus, you can play on a Real Sega CD!

I burn all my games at 24x ... no problems ....

Anyone can tell me y 4x is better in anyway .... I mean in digitally all info on CD exact on 24x or 4x ....so what's the point ...Thanks !
 

Link Hylia

New Member
like I said, ".. to insure a good burn"

that's the key phrase. sure, if 24x (or even 40x) works for you, go ahead and use it. if you ever have trouble, slow it down, to 4x is a good middle ground, the sweet spot, as 2x would take 40 minutes, and 1x will take over an hour.

me, I am not personally fond of making 2 minute coasters, and then have to redo it.
 

ExCyber

Staff member
Anyone can tell me y 4x is better in anyway .... I mean in digitally all info on CD exact on 24x or 4x ....so what's the point ...Thanks !

Digital information cannot be read/written without going through an analog translation of some kind. Even though the data is defined in terms of discrete states, the physical representation of those states is effectively analog and can have virtually any problem that any comparable analog medium can have. In the case of CD-R, combining sub-par equipment or media with high read/write speeds can result in a "blurry" data channel that cannot be consistently read. Of course, some burners and media have no serious problems with high speeds, but unless you know that you have a high-quality burner and media it's usually better to play it safe and burn at a slower speed - unless you really can't wait an extra 10-15 minutes for that disc...
 

archiver

New Member
Me, I'd rather wait those extra 10-15 minutes that ExCyber mentions than keep spending money trying to find a drive that can consistably burn reliably at high speeds, as well as the right media to do so.

Few things are worse than finalizing a burn, then coming back to the archive several months later to find you can't read the data from the disc....
 

kx4

New Member
the burn at <whatever>X speed thing dosen't apply anymore, and didn't apply much in the first place. If I gave you a stack of cd's burned at 1x and a stack of the same burned at 40x on a decent burner you wouldn't be able to tell the diffrence. Quality comes from the burner you use, not the speed it writes at.

Also if you buy crap media you'll find problems later when you try and make a copy or use that disc, because crap media usually appears to burn fine but has bad spots.
 

archiver

New Member
>>the burn at <whatever>X speed thing dosen't apply anymore, and didn't apply much in the first place.

Bullshit. It *did* and still does apply, otherwise it wouldn't have still be recommended so much to people who are have making coasters with "decent" burners.

>>If I gave you a stack of cd's burned at 1x and a stack of the same burned at 40x on a decent burner you wouldn't be able to tell the diffrence.

By looking at them, well duh, no. If there's problems with getting data from the the disc (either data or audio), most people could tell you who the initial suspect is going to be.

>>Quality comes from the burner you use, not the speed it writes at.

New(er) burners burn better at faster speeds, but that doesn't guarantee perfection in every case. There's other just-as-significant factors like as well... like software..

>Also if you buy crap media you'll find problems later when you try and make a copy or use that disc, because crap media usually appears to burn fine but has bad spots.

The advice of buying reliable media has been around just as long as the advice of burning at slower speeds, that's nothing new. I like my Lite-On over my other drives, but I still burn slow to play it safe, it's certainly worth it to me.

As for those spots, I suppose if you write on them with a green magic marker, it helps....


/sarcasm
 

ExCyber

Staff member
As for those spots, I suppose if you write on them with a green magic marker, it helps...

This is a myth! What you really need to do is invest in a good demagnetizing disc and some stabilizer rings... :
:
 

blackbrolly

New Member
Originally posted by Curtis@Aug. 20 2002, 7:13 am

Or if you want to play from CD, just burn the files as data and load them from the CD. Saves you the hassle of trying to get Gens to recognise your CD drive too.

How cAN THIS bE DONE?
 

Curtis

Member
Take the ISO/MP3 files, use your favourite CD burning app to create a data disc and simply burn said ISO/MP3 files. It will mean that you can't use the disc in a real SCD, but it'll save you some HDD space and you'll be able to have multiple games on the one disc.
 
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