Song of the South? LD wtf?

FAKK2

New Member
Like it says, wtf is this Song of the South made by Walt Disney, got an academy award, but never will be for sale by disney again? I never heard of this movie before? Does anyone here know what the movie is and if its worth that much...eBay Link I collect LDs....
 

Cynnamin

New Member
That's because it's quite racist
 

Gallstaff

Member
I think I heard of this. It's about the civil war only it's um child-friendly. I don't know how you could possibly make the conept of the bloodiest war ever faught child friendly but I guess disney gave it a shot... and failed.
 

Michaias

New Member
Yeah....racist. Something about happy-go-lucky slave. Yay. I'm so glad I can be a great slave for my loving white plantation owner who beats me repeatedly in the head every day when he looks at me funny. But that's OK because I'm just a lowly black slave and I'm happy to pick your cotton, master sir....

Yeah....I think the movie (cartoon?) whatever, went something like that. Pretty racist at the core. Fucking Disney. Pricks. They should go to Hell. All the kids would be much better off, and I wouldn't have to bash them for being racist.

....Wow....Nyquil is good shit. ::Left eye droops lazily::
 

VertigoXX

Mid Boss
It was the Disney film that the "Zippity Doo Dah" song came from. It mixed live action and animation. One of the animated portions was the story of Briar Rabbit. It had a lot of stuff in it that is not racialy P.C. today. Disney released it on video and LD a while back, then recalled it after some protest or another got started, stating that it was shelved for good. You can easily find DVD copies now on the bootleg market, recorded from the LD.
 

FAKK2

New Member
thanks vertigo, I think I remember seeing it on tv when I was younger, the zippidie doo daa thing rings a bell, I remember an older black guy singin it, with cartoon birds flying around and stuff.....hmmm wierd....maby they were trippin while making it, it did get an academy award.
What do you think the chances are that disney would actually make it on DVD? I mean non bootleg, a real version....maby the LaserDisc is worth buying?
 

Taelon

Member
Yeah! I mean... yeah!

Don't go judging Disney so quickly when (almost) none of you have really seen of the movie and only know it's banned because of the civil war stuff. Actually, from what -I- know, it's a pretty cute movie, quite child-friendly, and the, um, "re-dressing" of how things were between blacks and whites back then is at most a historical concern... but not a blatant misrepresentation. Many feel that the movie is unjustly banned and others are much more deserving of such a ban, and I'm one of them.

I never did hear of an LD version of the movie though, nor DVD copies on the black market. I do know you can buy the VHS PAL version from the UK, then have it converted to NTSC here in the States, and that's completely legal.

I for one would like to hook up a multi-format VCR to whatever my next PC will be (my current one is slow) and make direct digital video copies to compress to DivX and store on CDRs. Hehe, I had in mind doing that with Babycakes (starring Ricki Lake) too, only then I got lucky and the movie was suddenly re-released on DVD. I very nearly had spent 50 bucks on a VHS copy and am glad I didn't.


Hey, since I brought that up - what's the usual way of digitizing a video signal and storing it as an .avi (or whatever) file?

Is it of any concern whether a PAL or NTSC signal is fed into the computer, or must it be NTSC?

Are there multi-format VCRs that not only play back PAL tapes, but convert the signal to NTSC before outputting it as well?

I'd like some starting pointers, maybe online FAQs/guides on that stuff.
 

racketboy

Member
Originally posted by Taelon@Nov. 22 2002, 11:15 am

Hey, since I brought that up - what's the usual way of digitizing a video signal and storing it as an .avi (or whatever) file?

Is it of any concern whether a PAL or NTSC signal is fed into the computer, or must it be NTSC?

Are there multi-format VCRs that not only play back PAL tapes, but convert the signal to NTSC before outputting it as well?

I'd like some starting pointers, maybe online FAQs/guides on that stuff.

Check here -- http://arstechnica.infopop.net/OpenTop....7909965

They have some FAQs and other posts on similar things

Here's the FAQ:

http://faq.arstechnica.com/?s=1
 

VertigoXX

Mid Boss
Vertigo's definition of "bootleg market" for videos and DVD's: Just find your nearest nationaly advertised comic book convention. (Next one is in Columbus, OH, November 30 and December 1.) There will be at least a dozen guys there selling nothing but bootleg tapes and discs. The Song of the South DVD boots were a big item around at the Pittsburgh con earlier this year. (I should'a picked one up then, since I won't be able to make Mid-Ohio next week.) Lots of out-of-print, not-avaliable-in-the-USA, or never-released items can be found at these shows, as well as uncensored versions and unreleased directors cuts. Some stuff I've picked up; the Gen 13 movie (never in USA), Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere (never in USA), DUBBED and SUBBED Transformers Headmasters and Victory (never in USA, translation by fans), Star Wars Wookie Christmas Special (Lucas won't admit it exists), Roger Corman's Fantastic Four movie (never released at all), Clerks: Sundance Version (bought before the DVD came out). And on the less-than-legal side, you can usualy find plenty of pre-release or just-released movies, but all they are is recordings or transfers of the same bootlegs found on IRC.
 

Michaias

New Member
Originally posted by racketboy@Nov. 22 2002, 11:09 am

So does that make Huckleberry Finn racist?

That's a great story and was re-done as a movie not too long ago.

Actually, yes. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is on the top 5 list of banned books in the United States public school system. (I think its either number 1 or 2. Wait....I think The Catcher in the Rye holds the number one spot). At any rate, I know that AP high school students are allowed to read these books, but regular literature students are not. Actually, it's completely pointless to argue whether something is racist or offensive or not. If I tell you something offends me or I think it's racist, how can anyone contradict that statement? I feel offended, not you. Therefore, I think that if someone has a legitimate claim as to why some particular distribution of media is offensive, then their opinions should be respected. I realize that "legitimate claim" is a rather vague term, but this is why we have a judicial system in place to determine the validity of such claims. Some may be debatable, but I'm sure that most REAL legitimate claims are fairly obvious and even if you disagree with the claim, I am sure that you can see the other person's side of the story and understand their concerns.

And there are my insignificant thoughts on the matter.
)

< /RANT >
 

Quadriflax

New Member
Originally posted by Michaias@Nov. 23 2002, 12:42 pm

Actually, yes. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is on the top 5 list of banned books in the United States public school system. (I think its either number 1 or 2. Wait....I think The Catcher in the Rye holds the number one spot). At any rate, I know that AP high school students are allowed to read these books, but regular literature students are not.

Um, no. My girlfriend's brother read Huck Finn last year in 7th grade and I read Catcher in the Rye in 11th grade. Unless this is VERY recent, I don't think they're banned. Maybe in some states, but not on a nationwide level.
 

Michaias

New Member
Originally posted by Quadriflax@Nov. 23 2002, 2:09 pm

Um, no. My girlfriend's brother read Huck Finn last year in 7th grade and I read Catcher in the Rye in 11th grade. Unless this is VERY recent, I don't think they're banned. Maybe in some states, but not on a nationwide level.

< RANT AGAIN >

What the Hell? OK....The banned list thingie. These are books that parents/community members, etc. feel should not be read by public school students. I read The Catcher in the Rye last year in 11th AP Literature. The college prep students (we don't have anything below college prep at my school) were not allowed to read these books. I think what it all basically boils down to is how much local community members bitch about what their kids may or may not read. So, something like....say Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison, for example, is not permitted to be read by regular high school students if the local parents/community members feel that the book contains "explicit citations of things which are real" (offensive material) to quote The Offspring.

I'm sure you can tell by my 2 posts on this thread that I'm rather divided on the matter. I do think that parents should have some say in what their children learn in public school instituions (you wouldn't want a Christian teaching your child his or her morals if you are Buddhist), but then again, I feel that many parents are stupid and should not be granted this privilege. For example, let's say your mother/father is racist and doesn't want you reading anything written by a member of a different race. I think that's incredibly stupid and that particular parent's concerns should be ignored. I know that statement, in itself, sounds rather narrow-minded since individuals are entitled to hold whatever opinion they choose, and parents should be allowed to moderate what their children are subjected to.

Perhaps once adolescence is reached, a child should begin deciding for him or herself what he or she believes is appropriate media to indulge in. This debate has been roaring for years, though (everything from music to video games to books). It's difficult for any one individual to determine how another individual should raise his or her child and what is appropriate media consumption for said child. I suppose it all comes down to a game of "Who's Morals are Correct?" If you are racist/sexist/homophobic/discriminatory against individuals who are different (no, this does not include murderers, thieves, liars, etc.), then your morals tell you it's OK to tell children this. My morals however, strive for some form of equality, and I believe that it is possible to hold your own opinions without being intrusive upon other people's minds or ideas.

Wow....This has strayed far....I suppose that children should be allowed to read any literature avaible (once they are an adolescent). However, I don't think that anyone should undergo forced subjection to any media if they feel it is offensive to them (once again, LEGITIMATE REASON). Freedom of speech and of the press allows a lot of discriminatory things to be said/written/recorded. I suppose I cannot personally do anything to stop this since I do believe freedom of speech is a generally good thing. But I can think people are stupid for some of the opinions they hold. And I'm sure many people will think I'm stupid for the opinions I hold, but isn't that what makes us all so beautiful?
 

Quadriflax

New Member
I suggest you read The Disuniting of America by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. It's somewhat related to all this. It's about the fight that went on between history professors as to how history should be taught. About what should and shouldn't be taught. Certain minority groups liked to raise their voice to contest the Eurocentric root of our history. It's an interesting read and it's quite short.
 

sizone

New Member
VertigoXX Posted on Nov. 23 2002, 4:11 am

Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere (never in USA),


what format?

the bbc only sells it on vhs

ohh and alot of pbs stations aired it a few years ago so technically it was in usa. not great, but considering that i spent the better part of my adolescence reading sandman comics i found it enjoyable. that lowfi mid 90's hidden london underground goth look's kinda stylish too
 
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