Looking for ISO+MP3 to Bin/Cue converter

chortya

New Member
Does anyone know how to convert ISO+mp3 to Bin+Cue fast. Of couse I can mount Iso+mp3 and than rip .bin with CDRWIN but it takes toooo long


Thnx in advance.
 

Jurai

Ban Hammered
if ppl start bin/cue'ing their shitty iso+mp3 versions of games and trying to give them to me im gonna bust some heads
 

Gear

New Member
Originally posted by Jurai@Apr 27, 2003 @ 11:17 AM

if ppl start bin/cue'ing their shitty iso+mp3 versions of games and trying to give them to me im gonna bust some heads

Or better start to think about to buy some originals...
 

chortya

New Member
So I needed this for Saturn emulator (thnx Gavionne!), but I've found another solution:

Iso+wav+Cue, DaemonTools and -DISK option in emulator, works perfectly.

2Jurai

what is the difference between original CD ripped to bin/cue and iso+mp3 ripped to bin/cue? Quality of sound tracks?
 

Taelon

Member
bin/cue images are a 1:1 representation of the original CD and will result in a 1:1 burned copy.

iso/mp3 images differ in sound quality for one thing, yes, but very little if at all. MP3 is after all the compression format of choice in its own right, and unless some idiot thinks ripping CD tracks to 96kbps MP3 files (or less) is a cool thing to do, the audio comes out just fine.

The OTHER thing with iso/mp3 rips is that when burned back to disc, the audio tracks won't land exactly in the same spot they are in on the original disc. There are two reasons for that:

1. WAV -> MP3 -> WAV conversions result in files of slightly different sizes because various encoders and decoders insert/remove very brief bits of silence at the beginning and/or end of an MP3 file. The size difference is negligible though and only causes audio tracks to be a few sectors off on the CD (small fractions of a second).

2. Practically all software rips data tracks to ISO files with the gap after the data track included in the ISO. This can be bad since the ISO usually ends up being 150 sectors too long, pushing audio tracks down by 2 seconds on a burned CD. Depending on the particular game burned this may have no effect, the effect of garbled audio, or the effect of the game crashing... I could go into detail but I think I'll save that for a FAQ I've been thinking of writing up...
 

chortya

New Member
wow, thnx for great info


2Jurai

Sorry I can't make you "happy" with iso+mp3 to bin/cue converted games..
Just because the firewall of my Uni (aka ISP) doesn't allow me to upload...
 

Curtis

Member
MP3 is a very personal thing. To my ears, 128K sounds like absolute trash. At about 192K things get a bit better. A lot of other people are really fine with the quality of MP3, but there is a noticable difference if you look for it. Personally, I no longer use MP3 for anything - OGG ownz.


Original -> MP3 -> WAV is not a good thing if you value quality sounds and/or use headphones. Besides, when people download a Bin/Cue version of a game they do it because:

a) They have the bandwidth to download the bigger files, and

They are doing it because they expect to get a high quality copy (if there is such a thing)
 

King M

New Member
Originally posted by Taelon@Apr 28, 2003 @ 01:49 PM



2. Practically all software rips data tracks to ISO files with the gap after the data track included in the ISO. This can be bad since the ISO usually ends up being 150 sectors too long, pushing audio tracks down by 2 seconds on a burned CD. Depending on the particular game burned this may have no effect, the effect of garbled audio, or the effect of the game crashing... I could go into detail but I think I'll save that for a FAQ I've been thinking of writing up...

(As far as Sega CD discs are concerend) That is not necessarily true, it depends on how you rip the data track and how you load your files for burning.

In my opinion, CDRWin is probably the best program ripping Sega CD games. When you make a 1:1 image with CDRWin, it skips over the 150 unreadable sectors at the end of the data track and replaces it with a postgap 2:00 in the cue file. The rest of the disc is standard 2 second gap, audio track, 2 second gap, etc. If you use something like cdmage (also an excellent tool) to extract the iso, there will be nothing there to represent those last 150 sectors. Thus you need to add the 2 second postgap when you use the iso-mp3 set to make a new disc. To note, Alcohol 120% also skips the 150 sectors and uses a postgap in the cue, but it also fucks up the rest of the cue so DO NOT USE ALCOHOL 120% TO RIP SEGA CD GAMES.

You are right about most other software. Programs such as Blindwrite and CloneCD include the funky 150 sectors in the bin file, as garbage data, so there is no postgap line in the cue file. If you use cdmage on these images, the data track iso -will- have the 150 sectors, so you would not want to add the postgap when setting up a new disc layout. Nero and Discjuggler also belong in this group.

So, if you know the source of your iso, it is possible to layout a new disc from an iso-mp3 set that will have data in the near area of the original disc, if you don't worry about the difference due to mp3 > wav conversions.

But just to reiterate, DO NOT MAKE A BIN-CUE FROM AN ISO-MP3 SET AND PASS IT OFF AS A 1:1. If you are found out, you will likely be harmed. If you need to do it to suit your own purposes, that's fine, just keep it to yourself.

btw I have not worked with Saturn discs, so I can't comment on ripping those.
 

mal

Member
Originally posted by King M@Apr 29, 2003 @ 03:59 PM

btw I have not worked with Saturn discs, so I can't comment on ripping those.

I'd say that it would apply to Saturn games as well.

Can't think why it wouldn't.
 

Taelon

Member
KingM... I'm not sure but you may have missed what I was saying in my previous post. While you make accurate statements, you're always working on the assumption that one rips an entire CD to an image, not just Track 1 by itself. And that's what I was talking about. No cue sheets, no nothing, just the ISO file itself. You will get the 150 sectors of garbage tacked onto the ISO file during extraction - and the problem arises when you have this too-long ISO, audio files, then go to make a cuesheet of your own which includes a new postgap.

Sure, if you tell whatever program you use to explicitly rip the full disc to one coherent image, no problem. But if you rip all tracks to separate files with the idea to generate a new cuesheet later on... See what I'm saying now?

And I find that practically ALL software that can extract single tracks - be it ISObuster, CDmage, CDRWin - includes the postgap, which it shouldn't... (I've never used WinISO so I can't speak for that.)

Oh, and mal, yeah, it applies to Sega CD and Saturn games all the same.
 

King M

New Member
If the programs extract the 150 sectors into the iso, the solution is to not have a postgap 2:00 statement in the cue sheet.

btw CDRWin will not extract a single data track iso from a Sega CD disc
 

Taelon

Member
Sega Cue Maker always makes cue sheets with a new postgap. And burning an ISO that has the garbage at the end without a new postgap WILL result in an unplayable burn, at least on the Saturn. Those 150 sectors at the end of the ISO are not a true gap anymore, they're plain garbage data that's been error-corrected if your ISO is a Mode1/2048 one (and they usually are).

Trust me on this... The Saturn is VERY finicky about this gap, how or why I couldn't say but I do know that people - myself included - weren't able to get some bin/cues to burn and work without converting it to iso/wav, thus ignoring the gap in the .bin file and letting the CD recorder/software create a new gap via the cuesheet....

Anyway, the real issue here is that ripping a CD to iso/wav files and burning back causes the audio tracks to be off from where they should be - and a game that expects them to be in exactly the right place (i.e. has CDDA pseudo-files pointing to the audio tracks in the ISO filesystem) is usually going to barf on that...
 
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